Posts in Litterae Latinae
#32 – Sallust on the death of Catiline | Latin texts 8

Sallust is by far my favourite Roman historian. No other is able to combine nostalgia, moral judgement, and an engaging narrative style in such a powerful manner. The passage you’ll listen to now is taken from Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae. In the recording you can listen to the Latin text describing the demise of Catiline, the arch-nemesis of Cicero.

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#31 – The story of Aeneas | Latin texts 7..#31 – Fabula de Aenea | Litterae Latinae 7

Aeneas, the famous Trojan, that took the long way around to get to his promised land of Italy. On the way he broke the heart of Queen Dido—inadvertently, according to legend, giving rise to Hannibal, the Carthaginian avenger, that would almost conquer Rome many centuries later. Listen to the audio of this intermediate level Latin story of Aeneas life. Enjoy!

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#30 – Cicero's quest for the tomb of Archimedes | Latin texts 6

Marcus “Indy” Cicero goes on the quest to find the lost tomb of Archimedes. When even the natives did not believe his tomb was extant, Cicero, using a verse, sets out to prove them wrong. Unlike Indiana Jones, Cicero does not really get his hands dirty. Did he find it? Listen to the audio of this text taken from Cicero’s writings.

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#29 – The Roman House | Latin texts 5..#29 – Domus Romana | Litterae Latinae 5

If you don’t live close to a Roman villa, this is the next best thing. This passage takes you on a tour of a Roman house, and is written in an accessible Latin style. Listen to the audio and picture the house you are walking through! If you want to hear Latin discussing Roman houses, you can listen to the audio of this Latin text about Roman furniture.

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#28 – Gladiatorial combat in ancient Rome | Latin Texts 4

There is, as they say, nothing new under the sun. As the UFC is gaining popularity, and discussions arise regarding its role as entertainment, it can be useful to look to the Romans and their gladiatorial games, which though dramatically different, nevertheless, relate in spirit to the modern equivalents. Listen to the audio of the Latin text and follow along with the transcription.

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#25 – Tommaso Vallauri on Q. Curtius Rufus | Latin texts 1

Down through the centuries, many authors have penned histories of Roman literature in Latin. Whereas most of these works are often quite lengthy, the Historia critica litterarum Latinarum, book from which this text is taken is uncommon in its brevity. Written by Thomas Vallaurius, the passage treats the Roman historian Q. Curtius Rufus who wrote a compelling history of Alexander the Great’s deeds. While you listen to the audio you can follow along in the transcription.

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#20 – The life and death of Cicero : Part I | Latin texts

There are many biographies of Cicero—fewer in Latin, but of these, the short summary of his life composed by Charles Lhomond in the eighteenth century, is a great read for intermediate students, or anyone wanting to practice their Latin while learning about the Roman orator’s life. In this post you can listen to the Latin audio, and follow along in the transcription of the text from Lhomond.

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#13 – The Christmas Story x2 (Vulgate and Sebastien Châteillon) | Latin literature

The Christmas Story in Latin from the Vulgate is quite familiar to most students and teachers of Latin. This, however, is not the only Latin version of the story from the New Testament, for in 1551 the French humanist, Sébastien Châteillon, published his new translation of the Bible. Contrary to the Latin translation penned by St. Jerome in the 4th century, Châteillon’s version was written in a style much closer to that of Classical Latin. This post gives both texts as well as a recording of the two, for easy comparison of the two versions of the Christmas Story.

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#12 – Litterae Latinae | Catilina coniuratos hortatur (Sallustius, Cat. 20)

One of the most striking aspects of Sallust’s writing is his ability to compose speeches that capture the idea and persona of the speaker. I am not alone in my appreciation of his written oratory, as many a humanist student during the 16th century would have to commit to memory entire speeches taken from Sallust’s works. Now, listen to the Latin audio of Sallust’s take on Catiline’s speech where he addresses his co-conspirators in the conspiracy whichCicero famously put an end to.

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#11 – Litterae Latinae | Architectus audacissimus Alexandriae urbis (Vitr. 2. pr.)

Hodie vobis recitabo locum ex Vitruvii libro secundo de architectura, quis crederet? Quamquam multi sunt qui audito nomine Vitruvii fabulas iucundas minime exspectent, tamen in praefatione secundi libri invenitur fabula non iniucunda de Dinocrate architecho qui Alexandriam constituit, quam vobis nunc recitabo. Proinde aequo animo attendite!

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