Learn Latin with video and audio: 70 hours of spoken Latin

This is an update of last year's post "50 hours of spoken Latin". It is now 70 hours. Learning Latin with audio has never been easier. For the last few years, I've been on the lookout for any and all videos and recordings of the best Latin speakers in the world to listen to. The amount of recordings of speeches and lectures held in Latin is increasing rapidly, making exposing ourselves to immense amounts Latin audio easier than ever.

 

 

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Runae Anglicae.

Runae non modo apud gentes Septentrionales in usu erant, sed etiam in Anglia. De his multa dictu grata exponi possunt. Sane infitias non ibo me eam ob causam scribere ut runarum aviditas, quae non omnino satiari potest apud me, saltem mitigetur. Satis enim proloqui nequeo quantam afferat laetitiam, cum sub urbe Holmia versatus monumentum inscriptum iuxta viam conspicias. Non modo ipsa scripta oculis subicere, verum etiam tangere licet (caute sane!), ut facile mente fingas quam prope veteres adesse videantur!

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Omnia Vincit Amor: Love in ancient Rome

"Omnia vincit amor", or "Amor vincit omnia" as it is sometimes written, is one of history's most famous romantic expressions. It is also one of the most frequently used Latin phrases today. In this article, you will learn more about this quote from Virgil's pastoral poem and the man who uttered it. You will read about Roman love, about duties, despairs, longings, and love-sickness.

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Iacta Alea Est: Crossing the Rubicon

"Iacta alea est", or “alea iacta est”, is one of history's most famous quotes. It is also an old Latin expression, a battle cry and an ancient proverb. In this article you will learn more about this saying from Suetonius' biography of Julius Caesar and how to use the expression. You will get to know its origin, the situation in which it was used - if it was ever used at all - learn more about the Civil War between Caesar and Pompey, find out about Roman dice and maybe find the Rubicon. 

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